Reading List for Water Conservation and Water Science

Below is a list of books that may be found in public libraries and most public schools in the Phoenix water service area.

Elementary School:
  • Bear Loves Water. (Preschool) By Ellen Weiss. Bear teaches readers about water in all its forms - puddles, bubbles, snowflakes and clouds.
  • Brother Eagle, Sister Sky: A Message from Chief Seattle. (4-8 years) Illustrated by Susan Jeffers. A story about Native American beliefs and how each generation deserves to breathe fresh air, drink pure water and to enjoy all the beauty that the earth offers.
  • Common Ground: The Water, Earth, and Air We Share. By Molly Garrett Bang. Explains how everyone in the world depends on each of us individually to protect resources and maintain respect for the environment.
  • The Drop in My Drink. (9-12 years) By Meredity Hooper and Chris Coady. Water takes on fascinating new significance as readers discover the amazing complexity of a substance we take for granted. Includes a detailed depiction of water cycles, amazing facts and important environmental information.
  • A Drop Of Water: A Book of Science and Wonder. By Walter Wick. Shows the different forms of water in amazingly detailed photographs; explains water's properties.
  • The Earth and I. (4-8 years) By Frank Asch. Explains the friendship between the earth and a young child and what each can do for the other.
  • Follow the Water from the Brook to the Ocean. By Arthur Dorrors. Explains how water flows from brooks, to streams, to rivers, over waterfalls, through canyons and dams to eventually reach the ocean.
  • The Four Elements: Water. (Preschool) By Carme Solé Vendrell and J.M. Parramón.Text and illustrations explain the properties of water and its uses. Includes a special section to help adults answer children's questions.
  • Gullywasher. (4-8 years) By Joyce Rossi. In English and Spanish. A grandfather tells tall tales of his life as a cowboy (vaquero) and of the harsh life in the desert, flash floods, and wildlife.
  • I Am Wate.r (4-8 years) By Jean Marzollo. A first book about water in its different forms and uses.
  • Magic School Bus: At the Waterwork.s By Joanna Cole. Mrs. Frizzle, the science teacher, drives the magical school bus into a cloud where the children shrink to the size of water droplets and follow the course of the water through the city's waterworks system.
  • Magic School Bus: Se Salpica Toda. (4-8 years) By Joanna Cole. In Spanish, experience the earth's water cycle first hand as Mrs. Frizzle's class rises into the air, forms a rain cloud, a drizzles down to earth just like rain.
  • Magic School Bus: Wet All Over. (4-8 years) By Joanna Cole. Experience the earth's water cycle first hand as Mrs. Frizzle's class rises into the air, forms a rain cloud, a drizzles down to earth just like rain.
  • One Small Square: Cactus Desert. (6-10 years) By Donald M. Silver. Teaches about all the plants and wildlife that exist in one small square of desert - an excellent introduction to ecosystems and biodiversity.
  • River Ran Wild: An Environmental History. By Lynne Cherry. A history of New Hampshire's Nashua River starting 7,000 years ago until its recent reclamation. This is a good explanation of what can happen over time to a body of water and its wildlife -- what people can do to the environment and what they can do for it.
  • Snail Girl Brings Water. (6-10 years) By Geri Reams. A retelling of a traditional Navaho creation myth which explains how water came to earth.
  • Splish, Splash, Splosh. (4-8 years) By Mick Manning and Brita Granström. Join the adventures of a young boy and his dog and ride the waves, float on rain-filled clouds, shoot down fast-flowing rivers, and splash through sewers until you get where all water ends…and begins.
  • This Place is Dry. By Vicki Cobb, Barbara Lavallee (Illustrator). Surveys the living conditions in Arizona's Sonoran Desert for the people and the unusual animals that live there. Also describes the engineering accomplishment of the Hoover Dam.
  • Water. By Frank Asch. Aimed at very young children, this book artfully describes water in it many forms, its uses, and its role in our lives.
  • Water (My First Nature Book). By Andrienne Soutter-Perrot, Etienne Delessert (Illustrator). Explains water in its different form and why every living thing needs water.
  • Water Science, Water Fun: Great Things to Do with H2O. (9-12 years) By Noel Fiarotta and Phyllis Fiarotta. Lessons and experiments teach about floating, refraction, leaching temperature gravity, buoyancy, flow and other water properties.
  • Water, Water Everywhere (Discovery Readers). By Melvin Berger, Gilda Berger, Bobbi Tull (Illustrator). A book about the water cycle, treatment, distribution, and wastewater treatment.
  • Where Do Puddles Go? (4-8 years) By Fay Robinson. An early book to explain water cycles and water in all its forms.
  • Where Does Water Come From? (6-10 years) By C. Vance Cast. Clever Clavin shows how much water there is on earth, how wells are dug to bring it out of the ground, and how water treatment plants work.
  • The Woman Who Outshone the Sun/La Mujer Que Brillaba Aún Más Que el Sol. By Alejandro Cruz Martinez, Fernando Olivera (Illustrator). A bilingual tale from ancient Mexico that tells of a beautiful woman who arrives in a mountain village and is driven out because she is different, taking the river with her
  • The Wonder Thing. By Elizabeth Hathorn, Peter Gouldthorpe (illustrator), and Libby Hathorn. In a poetic guessing game comprised of pictures and words, young children can guess what the "wonder thing" is, as well as identify landscapes and places.

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Middle School:
  • Biodiversity. By Dorothy Hinshaw Patent. Stresses the importance of protecting the planet's rich gene pool for the survival of all species.
  • Clean Water. By Karen Barss. Discusses the problems of maintaining a clean water supply and relates this issue to such topics as pollution, depletion of resources, and other environmental concerns.
  • Deserts and Drylands. By Steve and Jane Parker. Explains why deserts have developed, where they are, and why overfarming has causes them to spread. Shows how plants and animals cope with extreme temperatures and lack of water.
  • A Drop Of Water: A Book of Science and Wonder. By Walter Wick. Shows the different forms of water in amazingly detailed photographs; explains water's properties.
  • Drought. By Christopher Lampton. Investigates the causes and disastrouns effects of drought, giving the history of some of the most severe droughts on record in the U.S. and elsewhere.
  • Every Drop Counts. By Jill C. Wheeler, Angela Kamstra (illustrator), and Kristi Schaeppi (illustrator). Full of ideas on how kids can stop water waste at home, outside, and in school. Also talks about water pollution.
  • Ground Water and Surface Water: A Single Resource. U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1139 Presents an overview of the interaction of ground water and surface water, in terms of both quantity and quality, as applied to a variety of terrains across the counry. Discusses the firm scientific foundation for policies governing the management and protection of aquifers and watersheds.
  • Our Endangered Planet: Rivers: Lakes. By Mary Hoff and Mary M. Rodgers. Explains the way rivers and lakes work together and how we have harmed them. It tells stories of success in reviving dying rivers and lakes and of failure to preserve our fresh water.
  • Protecting Our Rivers and Lakes. By Rosa Costa-Pau. Presents overviews of the problems facing the survival of rivers and lakes in light of the effects and solutions to pollution and the mismanagement of resources.
  • Rivers: Make It Work! By Andrew Haslam, Barbara Taylor. Explains where rivers come from, why people settle near them, and how rivers form valleys and underground caves. Discusses how rivers create energy and why it's important to control flooding.
  • Water : A Resource in Crisis. By Eileen Lucas. Discusses the quality and quantity of water on a global scale and includes discussions of resources, the ways we use water, pollution, making water safe, taking care of our water, and taking action.
  • Water Conservation: Student Edition. By Leslie Crawford, Jeri Hayes (Editor), Cathy Anderson (Editor) Shows students different ways to analyze, consider options, and take action on issues such as sources of water pollution, community water supply, the school water system, reading a water bill, conservation technologies and practices, and assessing costs and benefits.
  • Water (Designs in Science): How Technology Mirrors Nature. By Sally Morgan and Adrian Morgan. Investigates the use of water from water for energy and transportation to water as a solvent. Other topics include filtration, desalination, recycling and conservation.
  • Water Squeeze. By Mary O,Neill. Discusses the importance of water in our lives and the dangers we create when we pollute the waters of the planet.

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High School and Adult:
  • Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. By Marc Reisner. This is a history of the American West's water and its great water projects that transplanted water to allow the phenomenal growth of California and the Southwest. The book's perspective of water rights, and ecologic and economic consequences of such actions focuses on government and business tactics.
  • Food and Water: Threats, Shortages and Solutions. By Bernard S. Cayne (Editor), Jenny E. Tesar. Discusses the vital importance of having an adequate supply of food and water and the effects of pursuing this need though various forms of storage and farming methods.
  • From Reclamation to Sustainability: Water, Agriculture and the Environment in the American West. By Lawrence J. MacDonnell. Tells the stories of four places in the West where development and use of water, primarily for irrigated agriculture, have been central to economic and social development.
  • Gila: The Life and Death of an American River. By Gregory McNamee. Follows the ecologic history of the Gila River from its source in New Mexico, through its confluence with the Colorado River and into Arizona. Today, half of the Gila is dead, due to overgrazing, damming, and other practices.
  • Ground Water and Surface Water: A Single Resource. U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1139. Presents an overview of the interaction of ground water and surface water, in terms of both quantity and quality, as applied to a variety of terrains across the counry. Discusses the firm scientific foundation for policies governing the management and protection of aquifers and watersheds.
  • Last Oasis: Facing Water Scarcity. By Sandra Postel, Linda Starke (Editor). The worldwide water crisis, according to this book, is due to its ready availability, low cost, people's overuse, and lack of respect for this life-sustaining resource. Solutions are giving for restoring and sustaining this essential lifeline.
  • A River No More. By Philip L. Fradkin. This is a definitive history of the development of the Colorado River and the claims made upon it from its source in the Wyoming Rockies to the Gulf of California, where it evaporates in the sand.
  • A Story That Stands Like a Dam: Glen Canyon and the Struggle for the Soul of the West. By Russell Martin. A narrative history of hydroelectric dams and their impact on ecological processes downstream and its drownings of natural landscapes behind their headwalls.
  • Tapped Out: The Coming World Crisis in Water and What We Can Do About It. By Paul Simon. Discusses increasing global population and a water supply that cannot increase; faced with this crisis, what can the average citizen do?
  • Vision in the Desert: Carl Hayden and Hydropolitics in the American Southwest. By Jack L. August. Focuses on longtime Arizona senator, Carl Hayden, whose career was centered on water and its distribution, inseparable from the history of the West and development of arid lands.
  • Water: A Natural History. By Alice Outwater. Takes us on a journey 500 years past to present to recover a lost knowledge - how the land cleans its own water, how natural ecologically interacting systems can create healthy waterways.
  • Water : A Resource in Crisis. By Eileen Lucas. Discusses the quality and quantity of water on a global scale and includes discussions of resources, the ways we use water, pollution, making water safe, taking care of our water, and taking action.
  • Water: Almost Enough for Everyone. By Stephanie Ocko. Through case studies, anecdotes, facts, and theoretical explanations, this book provides a look at the social and environmental implications of severe droughts, their causes, and some possible solutions.
  • Water Conservation: Student Edition. By Leslie Crawford, Jeri Hayes (Editor), Cathy Anderson (Editor). Shows students different ways to analyze, consider options, and take action on issues such as sources of water pollution, community water supply, the school water system, reading a water bill, conservation technologies and practices, and assessing costs and benefits.
  • Water Wars: The Fight to Control and Conserve Nature's Most Precious Resource. By Olga Cossi. Discusses how we have to change our habits and our ways of thinking in order to preserve the earth's water resources - the crucial role water plays in nature and how dwindling supplies are affecting the various ecosystems of the world.

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